Aircraft Models

147 found, showing page 3 of 13

1/72 Curtiss P-40M/N Warhawk

$15.49ITEM: ACY12465

1/72 Curtiss P-40M/N Warhawk

Overview:

Overview: Rugged and reliable, the P-40 was used in every theater of WWII by the Royal Air Force and the U.S. Air Force. It was one of the most extensively produced American fighter aircraft. Although it was not an outstanding fighter, its ruggedness and reliability made it ideal for ground support and low altitude bombing missions.

Features:

Features: Decals For: - USAAF P-40N, 74th Squadron, Kwellin, China 1944 - RAAF P-40N, Lt.Col.G.C. Atherton, No80 Squadron, New Guinea, 1945

1/72 Hawker Tempest Mk.5

$15.49ITEM: ACY12466

1/72 Hawker Tempest Mk.5

Overview:

Overview: The Hawker Tempest showed impressive aerial combat ablility in fending off German V-1 "Flying Bombs" and providing air support for Allied troops that invaded Normandy, France on D-Day. It showed its versatility later on in the war, striking German ground targets as Allied forces moved across Europe. This aircraft featured Hispano cannons and a 2,180 HP Napier Sabre II engine that allowed it to fly at speeds up to 435mph.

Features:

Features: - Fully engraved pannel lines and rivet detail. - Optional position canopy and landing gear door. - Highly detailed cockpit interior and landing gear bay.

1/72 ME BF109G-6

$15.49/ EA

1/72 ME BF109G-6

$15.49ITEM: ACY12467

1/72 ME BF109G-6

Overview:

Overview: During WWII the Bf109 Messerschmitt was used as an escort for German bombers during the Battle of Britain. In this capacity it was shown that the Bf109 had too limited a range to be fully effective in that capacity so it was decided that it should be used as a defensive fighter. As the war progressed the G version was developed to improve performance. This version became the most extensively built of the Bf109. To increase its capabilities a Daimler-Benz DB605A 1,475Hp 12 cylinder engine was used. The main armament of the Bf109G was a pair of 13mm machine guns mounted under the cowling ahead of the cockpit canopy. It was also armed with a 20mm MG151 or 30mm MK108 cannon that was fired through the prop spinner. With the improved engine and armament the Bf109G became one of the most respected fighter aircraft of WWII. It is thought that some 35,000 Bf109s of all versions were produced. Many went into Czech Air Force service after the war, and was also used by the Israeli Air Force.

Features:

Features: - Optional position of canopy & landing gear door - Highly detailed cockpit interior - Fully engraved panel lines & rivet detail

1/72 Fockewulf Fw190A-6/8

$14.49ITEM: ACY12480

1/72 Fockewulf Fw190A-6/8

Overview:

Overview: The Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 Wurger (Butcher Bird), was the last production version of the Fw 190 series with a radial engine. In 1944 over 1300 of these aircraft were built, more than any other Fw 190 version. The engine was an MW-50 boosted, (methanol-water), twin row, fourteen cylinder, BMW 801 D-2. This engine combination produced 1700 h.p. for take-off and up to 1440 h.p. at 18,700 feet. Normal armament was made up of two MG 151 cannons in each wing and two MG 131 cannons in the fuselage, however, a common addition to this was a WB 151/20 gun pack mounted under each wing. When an Fw 190A-8 was fitted with these gun packs they were redesignated as Fw 190A-8/R-1. The decals in this kit are for an Fw 190A-8 of the ��/JG "Grun Herz".

Features:

Features: - Fully engraved panel lines & rivet detail. - Highly detailed cockpit interior & landing gear bay - Can be assembled as either FW190A6 or FW190A8

1/72 F6F-3/5 USA Hellcat

$14.49ITEM: ACY12481

1/72 F6F-3/5 USA Hellcat

Overview:

Overview: Of the 6,477 Japanese aircraft shot down by US Navy pilots in World War II, 5,156 were accounted for by the F6F Hellcat. Prior to its operational debut in 1943, the Navy Wildcats often were no match for the nimble Japanese Zero-Sen. The Hellcat, with its speed, armor and heavy armament changed all that, becoming the dominant fighter of the era. A total of 12,275 Hellcats of all varieties were manufactured before production ceased in August 1945. Used in reserve squadrons for many years after 1945, the Hellcats even served in the Korean War as remote-controlled flying bombs against North Korean ground targets. The F6F-5 Hellcat, produced in larger number than any other variant had a wingspan of 13.05 meters, a length of 10.23 meters and a height of 3.99 meters. Its maximum speed was 380 mph at 23,400 feet ; landing speed was 88mph. The F6F was armed with six 50 cal machine guns or four 20mm cannon. Two 1,000 pound bombs could be carried under the wings. Features: - Accurately Reproduced Model Aircraft

1/72 Spitfire Mk XIV-CRAF

$14.49ITEM: ACY12484

1/72 Spitfire Mk XIV-CRAF

Overview:

Overview: History was forever made on October 5, 1944 when a Spitfire XIV of No.610 Squadron was the first Allied aircraft to shoot down a turbojet-powered Messerschmitt 262A Swallow! Designed as an experimental Mark V fore-runner of future Griffin-engined Spitfires, it proved so promising, it was named the Mark XIV and rushed into production. Over 1,000 aircraft of this type were manufactured and deployed before the end of World War II. It was the Mark XIV that finally had the range and maneuverability to go against the FW-190 on equal terms. Powered by the two-stage Griffin type 65 engine, the Mark XIV differed from the earlier Spitfires by its larger rudder and elevators, five-bladed ROTOL propeller and four 20mm cannon mounted in its type "C" or "E" wing. Besides its successful battle history, in particular shooting down over 300 V-1 Flying Bombs, many aviation enthusiasts regard the Spitfire Mark XIV as one of the most beautiful fighter airplanes ever designed. Features: - Fully engraved panel lines and rivet detail - Highly detailed cockpit interior and landing gear compartment - Optional position wings and landing gear

1/72 North AM P-51D USA Mustang

$14.49ITEM: ACY12485

1/72 North AM P-51D USA Mustang

Overview:

Overview: The controversy will never end, but of all the World War II fighter planes, the P-51D Mustang has to be regarded as the best all around fighter. The Focke-Wulf 190 may have been a better dog-fighter; the A6M5 Zero was probably the most nimble, but the tremendous range, firepower and speed of the Mustang endeared it to all who flew this outstanding airplane. Designed in only 90 days for the RAF, the original A-36 design was a fair but not outstanding airplane. When the plane was wedded to the superb Rolls Royce Merlin engine, the results were phenomenal. Features: - Highly detailed cockpit interior & landing gear bay. - Fully engraved panel lines & rivet detail. - Optional position canopy, landing gear and main wing flap.

1/72 AH-64A Apache

$13.49/ EA

1/72 AH-64A Apache

$13.49ITEM: ACY12488

1/72 AH-64A Apache

Overview:

Overview: When the AH-64A Apache entered production in 1983, the publicity releases described its mission as "Built to Fight, Designed to Survive". Until the Gulf War, the Apache had many critics who questioned its maintainability, reliability and capability under combat conditions. During the Gulf War, the Apache racked-up an outstandingly successful record of achievements. Its critics were forever silenced: many became its admirers! Armed with the Hellfire anti-tank missile system, its rapid-firing 30mm chain gun and Stinger missiles, the Apache proved its superiority in the attack role under the harshest of conditions. The TADS/PNVS system with its bug-eyed sensors gave the AH-64A its night vision and its odd appearance.

Features:

Features: - Highly detailed cockpit interior, landing gear - Fully engraved panel lines and rivet detail - Optional position canopy - Full complement under-wing stores included

1/72 Mitsubishi A6M5C Zero

$15.49ITEM: ACY12493

1/72 Mitsubishi A6M5C Zero

Overview:

Overview: The Zero Fighter(Reisen or Zero-Son) was the lmperial japanese Navy's first single-seat and single-engine shipboard fighter with the retractable undercarriage. It was the most produced types of all japanese combat aircraft of World WarII. Designed to the 1937 specifications. the Zuisei-powered prototype flew in the spring of 1939, but the most more successful Sakae-powered prototype was adopted as the Zero type 11, and two squadrons with 15 aircraft were sent to China in July 1940 for trials under operational conditions. More than 400 had been delivered by the time the type 21 and type 32 appeared at Pearl Harbor. After the battle of Midway the Allies slowly gained the ascendancy, and the Zero found itself outclassed by the F4U Corsair and F6F Hellcat. Mitsubishi urgently tried to devise improved versions and type 52 (A6M5) was built in quantities far greater than any other japanese combat aircraft. To satisfy front line demands for increased fire power and pilot protection, most of the changes were made in these areas under the designation type 52c (A6M5c). Especially, armament was increased to an additional 13mm machine gun mounted in each wing just outboard the 20mm cannon and undrawing bomb rack for 30kg bomb. Total production amounted to 10,937, of which 6,217 were built by Nakajima Hikoki and another ones were built by Mitsubishi jukogyo. In late of war, hundred of Zeros of many sub-types and young pilots were converted for reckless suicide attacks, Kamikaze.

Features:

Features: - Fully engraved panel lines and rivet detail - Highly detailed cockpit interior & landing gear bay - Wooden drop tank and bombs included

1/72 Spitfire & Hawker Typhoon(2 in 1) - 70th Anniversary of Normandy Invasion

$33.49ITEM: ACY12512

1/72 Spitfire & Hawker Typhoon(2 in 1) - 70th Anniversary of Normandy Invasion

Overview:

Overview: The Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XIV was a single engine, single seat fighter which served with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. In 1941 the Spitfire Mk.IV was the first Spitfire to be trialed with the new Rolls Royce Griffon engine. By the time the Griffon Spitfire entered service with the RAF in February 1943, subsequent modifications had redesignated the aircraft as the Spitfire Mk.XII. As successful as this new Spitfire was at low altitudes, the Mk.XII’s performance was actually inferior to the Merlin engine Mk.IX at medium and high altitudes. Thus, the Spitfire Mk.XIV entered service as an interim fix. Fitted with a Rolls Royce Griffon 65 with two-stage supercharger producing 2050 hp, the Mk.XIV immediately corrected many of the performance shortcomings suffered by the Mk.XII. The fuselage was strengthened to harness the powerful engine and a five bladed Rotol propeller replaced the earlier four bladed examples. Early models were fitted with the Type C wing although later Mk.XIVs were equipped with the Type E wing housing two 20mm Hispano cannons and two .50 caliber Browning machine guns or four 20mm cannons, as well as a high visibility teardrop canopy. A common modification to the Mk.XIV was the clipped wing, which increased roll rate and gave a marginal increase to speed, but at the most of rate of climb. The Spitfire Mk.XIV entered service with Nos. 91, 322 and 610 Squadrons in southeast England where it saw notable success as an interceptor against V-1 Flying Bombs but also as part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force in operations over occupied Europe. Spitfire Mk.XIVs were also planned for use in the Far East but whilst a number of airframes were shipped to Burma, none were operational before the end of the war. The Spitfire Mk.XIV met mixed reviews from its pilots; whilst there was no doubt of the huge performance increase the new variant offered, it was uncomfortable to fly and lacked the balance and control harmonization of earlier Merlin engine Spitfires. Just under 1000 Spitfire Mk.XIVs were produced with exports being employed by the Air Forces of India, Belgium and Thailand. The Hawker Typhoon was a single engine, single seat fighter which first entered service with the RAF in 1941. Typhoon fighters of the first production series were equipped with a canopy with massive framing and a Rover-produced car-type side door for cockpit access. The first modification of this was to replace some of the solid metal fairings with transparent panels and cut down the pilot’s head armor plate to help increase visibility. Lack of visibility remained a significant problem and whilst a new canopy was being developed, the bulky radio mast and its fairing were replaced with a whip aerial further aft along the fuselage. A new drop-shaped canopy was designed for the pilot's cockpit, providing a good all-round view. The new canopies were fitted on the production aircraft from September 1943 on. The fighters were equipped with more powerful 2,200 hp Napier Sabre Mk.IIB and 2,260 hp Napier Sabre Mk.IIC engines, as well as new four-bladed de Havilland propellers. The wing-mounted armament consisted of four 20 mm British Hispano Mk.II belt-fed cannons with 140 rounds per gun. The projecting cannon barrels were equipped with fairings to reduce drag. By the end of 1943, these improvements had been implemented on the majority of the Typhoons already in service. By the time these later Mk IBs were in service, the aircraft’s shortcomings as a fighter had been identified, but it coped perfectly in the role of a fighter-bomber and a close air-support aircraft, striking German airfields, communication lines, railways, and ships. Since Typhoons were flown at low altitudes under strong enemy anti-aircraft fire, the designers paid great attention to protecting the pilot and the aircraft's vital systems. The pilot's head and back were protected with an armored backrest and a 38-mm-thick armored glass windscreen. An armor plate protecting the engine was fitted behind the propeller fairing. After many early teething problems, critical failures and threats to be withdrawn from service altogether, the Typhoon finally found its niche as a rugged, dependable ground attack aircraft. It achieved notoriety amongst German soldiers during the Normandy campaign when, whilst Spitfires were achieving air superiority, the Typhoons were able to cause mayhem amongst German ground units. The Typhoon's production was discontinued in November 1945, and it was withdrawn from service in early 1947. All in all, 3,205 Hawker Typhoon Mk.IB aircraft were produced. Features: - Reproduced Spitfire MK.XIVc & Typhoon Mk.Ib - Detailed cockpit & landing gear - Fully engraved panel lines and rivet details - Two optional markings per aircraft by Cartograf

1/72 P-47D & FW190A-8 (2 in 1) - 70th Anniversary of Normandy Invasion

$33.49ITEM: ACY12513

1/72 P-47D & FW190A-8 (2 in 1) - 70th Anniversary of Normandy Invasion

Overview:

Overview: The Republic P-47 Thunderbolt was a World War II-era fighter aircraft produced by the American aerospace company Republic Aviation from 1941 through 1945. Its primary armament was eight .50-caliber machine guns, and in the fighter-bomber ground-attack role it could carry five-inch rockets or a bomb load of 2,500 lb (1,100 kg). When fully loaded, the P-47 weighed up to eight tons, making it one of the heaviest fighters of the war. The P-47 was designed around the powerful Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine, which was also used by two U.S. Navy/U.S. Marine Corps fighters, the Grumman F6F Hellcat and the Vought F4U Corsair. The Thunderbolt was effective as a short-to medium-range escort fighter in high-altitude air-to-air combat and ground attack in both the European and Pacific theaters. The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger (English: Butcherbird) was a German single-seat, single-engine fighter aircraft designed by Kurt Tank in the late 1930s and widely used during World War II. Along with its well-known counterpart, the Messerschmitt Bf 109, the Fw 190 became the backbone of the Luftwaffe's Jagdwaffe (Fighter Force). The twin-row BMW 801 radial engine that powered most operational versions enabled the Fw 190 to lift larger loads than the Bf 109, allowing its use as a day fighter, fighter-bomber, ground-attack aircraft and, to a lesser degree, night fighter. Features: - Marking of FW190A-8 known as Sally on D-Day - Reproduction of early P-47D Razorback - Fully engraved panel lines and rivet details - Detailed cockpit interior and landing gear

1/72 AH-64D Block II

$28.49ITEM: ACY12514

1/72 AH-64D Block II

Overview:

Overview: The AH-64D Apache Longbow is equipped with a glass cockpit and advanced sensors, the most noticeable of which being the AN/APG-78 Longbow millimeter-wave fire-control radar (FCR) target acquisition system and the Radar Frequency Interferometer (RFI), housed in a dome located above the main rotor. The radome's raised position enables target detection while the helicopter is behind obstacles (e.g. terrain, trees or buildings). The AN/APG-78 is capable of simultaneously tracking up to 128 targets and engaging up to 16 at once; an attack can be initiated within 30 seconds. A radio modem integrated with the sensor suite allows data to be shared with ground units and other Apaches, allowing them to fire on targets detected by a single helicopter. The aircraft is powered by a pair of uprated T700-GE-701C engines. The forward fuselage was expanded to accommodate new systems to improve survivability, navigation, and 'tactical internet' communications capabilities. In February 2003, the first Block II Apache was delivered to the U.S. Army, featuring digital communications upgrades. The Japanese Apache AH-64DJP variant is based on the AH-64D; it can be equipped with the AIM-92 Stinger air-to-air missiles for self-defense. Features: - Accurately reproduced AH-64D acted in IRAQ WAR 2003 - Detailed cockpit and twin-engine - Various air-to-surface and air-to-air weapons included

147 found, showing page 3 of 13